Artemis 1 moon rocket passes pre-flight tests despite problems

NASA officials say the latest round of pre-flight testing of the complicated Artemis I SLS rocket has had some successes, but challenges remain. The way NASA and Artemis execs explained it on a post-test teleconference – they got 90% of what they wanted out of that wetsuit rehearsal. One of the big steps they were able to accomplish was refueling the various tanks of the Space Launch System’s Rocket Stack with hundreds of thousands of supercooled fuel, a delicate process that takes hours. But a hydrogen leak and a few other issues prevented a full and critical pre-flight test from being completed. In a conference call on Tuesday, the Artemis launch director called Monday a big day because a lot has been accomplished. Charlie Blackwell-Thompson, NASA’s Artemis Launch Director, said. The simulated launch countdown stopped at T-29. Fall short of target to close to T-9 seconds, as launch validation criteria were not met. In other words, if Monday was the real launch day, it would have been erased. lessons learned and apply them, fix that 10% problem.” could include more testing on the pad or in the vehicle assembly building. Once that’s determined, we might have an indication of when the SLS will be launched for its uncrewed test mission around the moon. The first possibility is August.

NASA officials say the latest round of pre-flight testing of the complicated Artemis I SLS rocket has had some successes, but challenges remain.

The way NASA and Artemis execs explained it on a post-test teleconference – they got 90% of what they wanted out of that wetsuit rehearsal.

One of the big steps they were able to accomplish was filling the various tanks of the Space Launch System’s rocket stack with hundreds of thousands of supercooled fuel, a delicate process that takes several hours.

But a hydrogen leak and a few other issues prevented a full and critical pre-flight test from being completed.

In a conference call on Tuesday, the Artemis launch director called Monday a big day because a lot has been accomplished.

“The majority of our goals were met. There were maybe small pieces in that main goal that we were maybe a little behind on,” Artemis launch director Charlie Blackwell-Thompson told The NASA.

The simulated launch countdown stopped at T-29. Short of target to close to T-9 seconds as launch validation criteria were not met. In other words, if Monday was the real launch day, it would have been erased.

“Hopefully they learned an awful lot and got closer to where they could have done the countdown,” Florida Tech’s Don Platt said. “And they take the lessons learned and apply them, solve that 10% problem.”

Program officials will assimilate all the data collected during the intense series of tests.

After a few days, once the data is analyzed, we’ll hear what happens next, which could include more testing on the pad or in the vehicle assembly building.

Once that’s determined, we might have an indication of when the SLS will launch for its uncrewed test mission around the moon. The first possibility is August.

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